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WBAI 

Folio 



from the 

Pacifica 
Radio Archives 



This cover sheet created by 
Internet Archive for formatting 



August '77 




TUNE IN 

WOMEN'S 

WORK 

WEEKEND, 

AUGUST 

13 & 14 



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Personnel 



ADMINISTRATIVE: Anna Kosof 
(general manager), Jonelle Pagan 
(business manager), Bill Kortum 
(switchboard operator), Ira Liebin 
(subscriptions), Lindsay Audin (Fo- 
lio editor), Marty Goldensohn (act- 
ing publicity director). Rick Harris 
(program coordinator) 

ENGINEERING: Mike EdI (chief 
engineer), John Schmidt (acting 
chief engineer), Bill O'Neill (opera- 
tions director), David Marx, David 
Rapkin, Larry Chan, Miles Smith, 
David Sweet, Paul Wunder, Manoli 
Wetherell, Dick Demenus, Manya 
La Bruja, Burt Grossman, Steve 
Grivas 

NEWS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS: 
Abraham Aig (acting news direc- 
tor), Elaine Baly (urban affairs di- 
rector). Celeste Wesson (public af- 
fairs director), Lindsay Audin, 
Diane, Behar, Kent Benziger, Peg- 
gy Farber, John Fisk, Jerry Hatch, 
Lloyd James, John Kalish, Nina 
Mende, David Metzger, Peter Mil- 
liken, Betty Pilkington (U.N. Cor- 
respondent), Bruce Reznick, Helen 
Samm, Erica Schwartz, BobZalisk, 
Eileen Zalisk, Fred Kleinke (ad- 
ministrative worker) 

MUSIC: Mickey Bass, Chuck Berg, 
Jim Burton, the Laughing Cavalier, 
Candy Cohen, Ted Cohen, Carlos 
DeLeon, Bill Farrar, Ondina Fiore,- 
Sara Fishko, Ray Gaspard, Gary 
Giddens, Verna Gillis, Edward 
Haber, Bill Howie, Kathy Kaplan, 
Jamie Katz, Kathy Kurs, Many La 
Bruja, Lenny Lopate, Frank Mare, 
Marian McPartland, llhan Mima- 
roglu, Charles Mitchell, Mildred 
Norman, Rodger Parsons, Jude 
Quintiere, Max Salazar, Judy Sher- 
man, Marty Sokol, Richard Sud- 
halter. Bob Sztabnick, Jim Theo- 
bold, Roger Trilling, Chris Whent, 
Tom Whitmore, Paul Wunder 

ANNOUNCERS/LIVE RADIO: Jim 
Freund (chief announcer), Lindsay 
Ardwin, Ed Haber, Joe Frank, Viv 
Sutherland, Ondina Fiore, Bob 
Fass, Malachy McCourt, Clayton 
Riley, Mickey Waldman, Steve 
Post, Paul Gorman, Pablo Guzman, 
Stacyann Pober, Jan Albert, Frank 
Heller, Barbara Bernstein, Linda 
Perry, Pepsi Charles, Peter Bo- 
chan, Mike Sappol, Ellis Halzlip, 
Robbie Barrish, Bill Young, Mar- 
got Adier, Ken Davis, Al Kobryn, 
Paul Wunder, Mike Edt, Joan 
Hervey, Lynn Samuels, Judle Pas- 
ternak 



DRAMA, LITERATURE AND 
ART: Liza Bear, Courtney Callen- 
der, Joe Frank, Judith Ghinger, 
Joe Giordano, Lin Harris, Rick 
Harris, Moira Hodgson, Susan 
Howe, Annice Jacoby, Allen Paul 
Kobryn, Bill Kortum, Barbara 
Londin, Charles Potter, Mike Sap- 
pol, Charles Ruas (D&L director), 
Susan Scheftel, Edward M. Schnei- 
der, Judith VIvell, Bob and Eileen 
Zalisk 

OTHER PRODUCERS AND VOL- 
UNTEERS: Alfredo Bejar, Ron Bie- 
derman. Gale Cerel, Dacron Dark, 
Ken Davis, Jim Freund, Andrew 
Moses, Alexa Penzner, Adriene 
Piscitello, Stacyann Pober, Jay 
Rothman, Dr. Mark Chartrand, 
Barbara Berstein, Linda Perry, 
Kathy Smith, Phil Smith, Geneva 
Steinberg, Marc Raskin, denton/ 
Thor, Lynn Samuels, L. James Wil- 
son, Sandra Martinez, Martha 
Katz, David Sweet, Brian Kendel, 
Betty Fink, Graham Kendel, Larry 
Cox, Terry Ornstein, Gayrap Col- 
lective: Frank RIchter, Billy 
Schoell, David Winyard, Greg 
Gazis 

PRODUCERS, WOMEN'S PRO- 
GRAMMING: Carmen Garcia, Jer- 
ry Hatch, Judle Pasternak, Stacy- 
ann Pober, VIv Sutherland, Rebec- 
ca Tron, Irene Yarrow, Eileen 
Zalisk 



Pacifica 

Board 

members 



WBAI Local Board: Vernon An- 
drews, Ted Conant, Richard 
Asche, Ralph Engelman (chair- 
person) George Fox, Oscar Hanigs- 
berg, Alexander Hixon, Ken Jen- 
kins, Theresa Ornstein, David 
Lampel, Thelma Rechetnick 

Pacifica National Board: Isabel 
Alegria, R. Gordon Agnew (hono- 
rary chairperson). Bob Barron, 
Carol Breshears, Charles Brousse, 
Ralph Engelman, Edwin Goodman, 
Margaret Glaser, David Lampel, 
Peter Tagger, Tracy Westen, Ken 
Jenkins (chairperson), Jonas Ro- 
senfield, Jr. (vice president), Thel- 
ma Meltzer (2nd vice president), 
Ptter Franck (3rd vice president), 
Oscar Hanigsberg (treasurer) 



WBAI is on the air 24 hours a day, broadcasting at a frequency of 99.5 MHz. 
Our transmitter is located in the Empire State Building, and we broadcast 
with an effective radiated power of 5.4 kw (horizontal) and 3.85 (vertical). 
Power equivalent to 50 kw at 500 feet. Our Antenna stands 1223 feet above 
average terrain, and 1515 feet above sea level. The studios are located at 
359 E. 62nd St., New York, N.Y. 10021. Subscriptions and donations may be 
sent to WBAI, P.O. Box 12345, Church Street Station, New York, N.Y. 
10249. Business inquiries may be made by calling during working hours at 
(212) 826-0400. Our usual on the air number is (212) 371-5200. WBAI Is 
owned and operated by the Pacifica Foundation, a non-profit corporation 
operating four other stations in Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Berkeley 
and Houston. 

Production costs for the Folio are made possible, In part, through a grant 
from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. 



Report to 
the listener 

ABOUT PACIFICA 

WBAI is one of five non-commercial stations owned and operated by the Pacifica 
Foundation, a non-profit tax deductible organization. Founded 30 years ago by Lew Hill, a 
strong believer In "First Amendment Radio", Pacif lea's first radio venture was KPFA In 
Berkeley, California. Since thien It f)as started or acquired four otfier stations: KPFK (Los 
Angeles). WBAI. KPFT (Houston) and most recently WPFW (Wastilngton, D.C.). The vision 
of Lew HIM saw an Independent outlet for the discussion of all Issues— political, artistic and 
personal— and the advancement of the arts through training programs, concerts, stage 
drama and the like. 

WBAI was Initially a commercial station and was willed to Pacifica by Its owner, Louts 
Schweitzer, In 1960. As the political winds of the 60's shifted to the movements against war 
and for civil rights, WBAI and other Pacifica stations were In the vanguard of social change. 
Together, they covered Viet Nam and Birmingham In depth when the commercial media 
were only reading government press releases. As the women's, gay, environment and other 
movements moved to the forefront, the Pacifica stations were ready to act as their conduit to 
the people. During those busy years, the Pacifica stations experimented with numerous 
Innovations in format and style— some good and some not so good. The control of 
programming had been traditionally In the hands of those producing the programs with 
guidance, oversight and scheduling vested to a program director and, ultimately, the station 
manager. Generally, the support of the listeners for the programming allowed the manage- 
ment to avoid exercising its powers— except Is several specific cases. Among them was the 
uproar over Charles Pitts (who produced a show on gay rights) and his relationship to other 
staff members. In that case, the manager exercised the power to hire and fire as It Is 
delegated by the officers of the Foundation. 

The "power structure" that has existed since Pacifica was founded operates like this: the 
Foundation holds the FCC licenses for each of the stations and thus Is required to follow FCC 
rules as Interpreted by the Federal Communications Commission, the courts, the 
Foundation's attorneys and, on occasion, members of the national board of directors. That 
board holds all final legal and financial power of the Foundation but delegates some of It to a 
local board at each of Its stations. This local board then determines policy for Its station and 
orders the station manager to carry It out. 

How does each level get Its power? The Federal Communications Act of 1934 created the 
FCC as the regulatory body over the radio Industry and gave It the power to grant licenses for 
operation of transmitters on given frequencies. It divided those frequencies Into commercial 
and non-commercial channels and allowed organizations to apply for use of them based on 
various criteria. Pacifica satisfied the criteria to obtain five licenses during Its lifetime and It 
must renew them at regular intervals (WBAI's license Is up for renewal next Spring). Each 
renewal Is accompanied by a review of the station's performance (e.g., did It meet the need* 
of Its community) and the FCC can choose to deny renewal If It believes the license conditions 
are not being met or if there Is another entity that can show It can do a better job satisfying 
the license requirements. While the Foundation holds the licenses, Its Internal by-laws and 
policy statements govern Its actions. Like any corporate entity. It can enter Into binding 
contracts, be sued and borrow money. These Incorporation powers are granted by the State 
of California (where Pacifica Is based) and continue as long as the state's laws are ot>eyed. 
The Foundation's tax-deductible status (granted by the Internal Revenue Service) also 
remains In force when It follows the conditions of tax law and the provisions of Its charter. 
Finally, the clearance to solicit money is at the t>ehest of various state agencies whose 
regulations must be similarly observed. 

The Foundation's board Is a self-perpetuating body, electing new people to replace members 
who retire or die. Nominations are based upon such criteria as media understanding, Interest 
in education and organizational experience, as determined by the tx>ard. Between annual 
national meetings, an executive committee of the t>oard handles situations of a national 
nature. Several national board members sit on each local board and elect local citizens to aid 
them in forming local policies that conform to Foundation policies. Ultimately, local board 
members not on the national board act in an advisory capacity with final authority resting 
with the national board members. The station management keeps the local and national 
boards Informed on station matters and promulgates the policies developed by these groups. 

Through this system, the stations are governed according to the original Pacifica charter, 
which sets down listener sponsorship as the basis for financial support and responsiveness. 
Recently, many subscribers have Indicated that there Is a need for other mechanisms to 
improve listener Input. In answer, the national board approved a resolution supporting 
formation of "Friends" groups and the WBAI local board has stated that It Is Interested In 
receiving resumes of listeners seeking to become local board members. 

fvlost listeners have been unaware of Paclflca's structure since It was utilized In the past 
primarily to raise funds and fight the battles for free speech In the courts. Whrle finances 
were not a big problem, the boards generally remained out of sight. Now the Foundation Is 
ailing, with most stations deeply In debt, several divided on Ideological and personnel 
grounds and few solutions visible. As a result, the national board has begun to exercise the 
powers that have been dormant for a number of years In order to avoid further deterioration. 
One of the alterations It made In long standing policy was to allow an increase in the percent 
of grants taken by a station In order to maintain Its financial position. From talking to board 
members and reading minutes of meetings, It appears that other "emergency" efforts may 
be necessary to forestall firlanciai disruptions. Increased costs, the recent demand by New 
York City that WBAI pay $200,000 in taxes and a decreased level of donations over a long 
period has brought WBAI to a position where more txiard actions may occur. Such action 
could Include seeking out new sources of capital or moving to smaller quarters. Hopefully, 
this brief explanation of the operation of the Foundation will help clarify the need and the 
ways to Initiate constructive steps that will help maintain an ongoing outlet for free speech. 

Deor Editor... 

continued on page 11 



© 



nugust 

Program 

listings 



MONDAY 
1 



5:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Joe Frank 

7:00 MONDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with the Laughing Cavalier 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WHAT'S UP? 

WBAI's own series on astronomy and the 
known universe, hosted by Dr. Mark Char- 
trand, chairman of the American Museum 
Hayden Planetarium. Produced by Mark 
Chartrand with Jim Freund. 

1:00 BATTERED WOMEN 
A documentary on the problem of battered 
women: its roots causes, the difficulties of 
getting legal help, and some proposed long 
and short-term solutions. Produced by 
Kimberly Willis. 

1:30 LATIN MUSIC 
with Max Salazar 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Addiction Services with Lincoln Detox. A 

bi-weekly program which will look into the 

treatment and causes of drug addiction and 

alcoholism, especially as It relates to urban 

life. 

4:00 NUANCES 

live radio with Pepsi Charles 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the neJtt chapter of "Operation Luna" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 THE MUSIC OF JULE STYNE 

Jule Styne, composer of such classic musi- 
cal theater scores as "Gypsy", "Bells Are 
Ringing", "Peter Pan", "Funny Girl", 
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes ' and many 
others, expresses some strong views about 
theater music, popular music, commercial- 
ism and culture in this talk with Ira Weltz- 
man. He also reminisces about his long and 
prolific career. A taste of Mr. Styne's 
music is also Included. 

9:00 OUR CITY. OUR LIVES 
Women working In their own communities 
to better their lives and the life of their 
community. Produced by Jerry Hatch. 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
with Bill Farrar 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT SWAN SONG 

live radio with Mickey Waldman 



TUESDAY 

2 

5:00 SKYLIGHT 

live radio with Linda Perry 

7:00 TUESDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Gandv Cohen 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BRING IT WITH YOU 

a music program with Ed Haber 

1:00 FAR AFIELD 

This series will provide an alternative view 
of sports: interviews and analysis on pro- 
fessional sports, sports in socialist coun- 
tries (e.g., baseball in Cuba), jooging and 
racing in New York and more. Producers 
include Margot Adier, Larry Cox, Jim 
Freund, Rick Harris, David Levine, David 
Metzger, Mike Sappol and Bill Young. 

1:30 REGGAE 

music with Roger Trilling 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
The Day Care Action Coalition is a group of 
22 de-funded day care centers, now com- 
munity funded and operated. Programs 
will cover all areas of day care from com- 
munity organizing to creating new forms of 
day care. This is a regular bi-weekly 
program. 

4:00 MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 
live radio with Judle Pasternak 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

HOT FLASHES 

news from Majority Report 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 BLACK IMAGE 

with L. James Wilson and Sandra Martinez 

9:00 REAL LIVE LESBIAN SHOW 
Realizing that there are many different 
kinds of lesbians in the 90 mile radius co- 
vered by WBAI, The Real Live Lesbian 
Show offers a variety of programs. The 
community we wish to serve does not 
consist of just a few blocks In Manhattan, 
but shares a multitude of ethnic, artistic, 
social and political backgrounds. Although 
we will vary in concepts, much emphasis 
will be placed on the struggle, lifestyles, 
work and humor of individual lesbians who 
may or may not have any affiliation with 
lesbian organizations. It Is our wish to hear 
the beautiful voices of lesbians over the air 
sharing their experiences, and giving en- 
couragement to other lesbians who may be 
realizing for the first time that they have a 
choice. Produced by Retiecca Tron and 
Carmen Garcia. 



Ulomen's 

Ulork 

Uleelcenil 



For the first time, WBAI radio will present an entire 
weekend of programs by, for and about women. From 8:30 
on Saturday morning, August 13th, until 6:30 P.M. on 
Sunday, August 14th; the WBAI Women's Department will 
produce 34 continuous hours of programming focused on the 
subject of women and work. 

There will be collections of personal testimony and 
programs of analytic reportage. The participants in the 
"Work Weekend" will include homemakers, career women, 
third world women, women with unusual and usual jobs, 
unemployed women, women on welfare, older women, 
young women, white, pink and blue collar women, women 
who like what they do for a living, and women who hate it. 

Among the programs planned are: 
OUT OF THE (HOMO) FILE CABINET: In the Closet at 
Work. Lesbians share their anger and frustration at having 
to hide their identities from co-workers 8 hours a 
day . . . and some speak of what happens when they come 
out. (Producer: Irene Yarrow) 

WORKING (AND NON-WORKING) WOMEN SPEAK OUT 
Secretaries and artists, cabdrivers and housewives, women 
on unemployment and welfare, doctors, waiters and 
babysitters of all ages talk with Judie Pasternak about their 
jobs and the place of work in their lives. 
WHAT IS THIS THING CALLED WORK? 
Viv Sutherland addresses the definition of work, and 
women's reaction to various definitions: traditional jobs, 
non-traditional jobs, paid jobs, unpaid jobs, and The-ls-lt- 
Or-lsn't-lt-A-Job job, homemaking. 

CHILDCARE AND YOU IN NEW YORK CITY/EL QUIDO 
DE SU NINA Y USTED EN NUEVA YORK 
A comprehensive overview of child care services that are 
provided by the human resources administration — focusing 
on the work done by the Parent-Involvement Unit of this city 
agency. This program will be in both Spanish and English 
and will provide a great deal of information about this 
agency's funding, the application process, and eligibility 
requirements which affect all women applying for childcare 
services through the HRA. (Producer: Carmen Garcia) 

LESBIAN BARTENDERS IN LESBIAN BARS 
Who is working for you as you dance, drink and party at 
those popular Lesbian bars in the Village? What are the 
advantages and disadvantages of having an all women 
clientele? Before you go out tonight, listen to these women 
tell what they experience from the other side of the bar; the 
truth may be hard to swallow, but it packs quite a wallop! 

(Producer: Rebecca Tron) 
SEXUAL HARASSMENT ON THE JOB: Part II 
A continuation of the discussion started on Women's 
Consciousness Day at WBAI. Personal testimony and advice 
about dealing with sexual overtures at work. 

(Producer: Viv Sutherland) 
WHAT DO YbU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU GROW UP? 
Girl children talk about their futures. 

(Produced by Rebecca Tron and Viv Sutherland) 
WHISTLE WHILE YOU WORK 

A lot of women's music is not only politically "correct," it's 
also nice to listen to. Much of It deals with work, as well. 

(Producer: Viv Sutherland) 
PLUS: 

WOMEN AND SCIENCE 
WOMEN AND THE LAW 

AN ANTHROPOLOGIST LOOKS AT WOMEN'S WORK 
WOMEN, MONEY and POWER 
STARTING YOUR OWN BUSINESS 



® 



Ihe Uleek nt a Glome 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



Saturday 



Sunday 



Sam 

6 am 

7 am 

8 am 

9 am 



LIVE RADIO 


A Consort of 
Early Music 




LIVE RADIO 


Morning Show 
Paul Gorman 


Ted Cohen 




Roonn 1 01 
Steve Post 


program anno 


uncements NEWS 





10am- 
11 am 



Noon 



1 pm 



2 pm 

3 pm. 

4 pm 
5pm> 
6 pm 



Joe Frank 



Skylight 
Bernsteln/Pfrry 



LIVE RADIO 

Miscellaneous 
Ondlna Flore 



American Pie 
Ira Lleben 



Hour of the Wolf 
Jim Freund 



MORNING MUSIC 



The Kid's Show LR 
^0 Pepsi Charles 
11 



D&L (PA) SLOT 



D&L(PA)SLOT 



P.A. SLOT 



D&L SLOT 



Latin Music 
Max Satazar 



Reggae 
Roger Trilling 



MUSIC 

Punk Rock 
Tom Sztabnick 



Blues 



Come for to Sing 
Don Wade 



PUBLICAFFAIRS 
Bread And Roses 



Nuances 
Pepsi Charles 



More than Half the World 
Judle Pasternak 



LIVE RADIO 



Robert Knight 



to be announced 



El Barrio Nuevo 
Pablo Guzman 



Soundtrack 
Paul Wunder 

(Long Time 

Coming and Going 

— Stacyann Pober) 

LR 



Morning After the 
Night Before LR 

Jan Albert 



program announcements NEWS 



Golden Age of Radio 
Paul Wunder 



Lunchpall LR 
Paul Gorman 



Piper in the 
Meadow Straying 
Ed Haber M 



to be announced 



El RIncon Caliente 



M 



Carlos OeLeon 



CBB 



Hot Flashes program announcements 



CBB 



Here of a Sunday 
Morning M 
Chris Whent 



In the Spirit LR 



Lex Hixon 



Velvet 

Sledgehammer 

LR 



The Gospel Show M 
Lenny Lopate 



Live Radio 
Ellis Hatzlip 



7pm« 



NEWS 



8pm" 
9 pm I 
10pm 
11 pm 



P.A. SLOT 



P.A. SLOT 



Our City, Our Lives 



Black Image 
Wilson/Martinez 



Real Live Lesbian Show 
Tron/ Garcia 



Spectrum P.A. 
Rodger Parsons 



D&L (PA) SLOT 



Women's Studies 
Viv Sutherland 



P.A. SLOT 



P.A. SLOT 



Everywomanspace 
Irene Yarrow 



D&L (PA) SLOT 



Gayrap 
Collective 



-el 

9 



-10 



Jazz Sampler 
Bill Farrar 



Weatherbird 
Gary Giddens 



JAZZ 

Adventures 11 
Blx and Beyond Scrapple from the Apple in Jazz 

Dick Sudhalter Jamie Katz Mickey Bass 



Midnight 



Mickey Waldman 



Mike Sappol 



LIVE RADIO 
Clayton Riley 



What's Up? p ^ 
Mark Chartrand 



Grow Your Own 
Liz Christy 



P.A. 



Between the Tracks 
M Peter Bochan 



D&L SLOT 



Through the Opera 
Glass M 

Martin Sokol 



WBAi Performance 
D&L 



Frank Heller 



Malachy McCourt Malachy McCourt 



David Levlne 



Programs by Type 



PUBLICAFFAIRS 

General: 7:30-9:00 pm, M,Th 
Noon -1:30 pm, alt. 

Tu,W 
3-4:00 pm,M-F 

Consumer: 7-8:00pm,F 

8:30-9:30 pm. Sat 

Science: 7 -8:30 pm Sat 

8:30 - 9:00 pmM,Th 
(twice monthly) 

News: 6:30 pm, M- Sun 

(rebroadca8t9am, 
M-F,8am,Sat, 
Sun) 

(Community Bulletin Board: 
6:15pm, M,Th 



MUSIC 

.lazz: 10-Midnlght,M-F 

Rock: 1:30- 3:00 pm,W 

5-7:00 am, Th 
9:30- 11 :00pm, Sat 

Latin: 1:30-3:00pm, M, Tu 

3:30 -6:00pm, Sat 

Blues: 1:30- 3:00 pm.Th 

Country: 1:30-3:00pm, F 

Classical: 7-9:0Oam,W 

9:30-Noon, M-F • 
8:30-11:00 am, Sun 
7 -9:30 pm, Sun 

Gospel: 2:30 -4:00pm, Sun 

Movie: 5-8:0Oamalt.Sun 



DRAMA AND LITERATURE 

General: Noon-1:30pm, M, 
alt.Tu,Th,F 
7:30- 9:00 pm,W 
9:30- Midnight, Sun 
11:00-Midnight,Sat 

Radio plays: 11:00 -Noon Sat 
6:10 pm (approx), 
M-F 

LIVE RADIO 

5-7:00 am, M-F 
7-9:00 am, M,Tu, 

Th,F 
5 -8:00 am, alt. Sat, 

Sun 
4-6:00 pm, M-F 
Midnight-5:00am, 

M-Sun 



Notes: 

1 . program announcements are also read at 
noon and midnight 

2. letter codes are supplied to Indicate type 
of show where It may not be obvious from 
other copy: LR- live radio, M- music, D&L - 
drama and literature, PA - public affairs 

3. parentheses indicate the slot is shared 
by both programs on an every-other-week 
basis 

4. "SLOT" indicates that no specific show 
is allocated to the time period, but 
programs will come from Ihe department 
indicated 



SPECIAL INTEREST 

Women: 9-10:00pm, W,Th 
6:15-6:20 pm, Tu 
Gay: 9-10:00pm,Tu 

Third World: 7:30-9:00 pm, Tu 

4-6:00 pm. Sun 
Urban: 9- 10:00pm, M 
Spiritual: 11 -1:00pm, Sun 
8:30 -9:30 pm (first 
Sat each month) 



© 



10:00 WEATHERBIRD • 

|azz with Gary GIddens 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Mike Sappol 

WEDNESDAY 
3 



5:00 MISCELLANEOUS 
live radio with Ondlna Flore 

7:00 A CONSORT OF EARLY MUSIC 
with Tad Cohen 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jim Theobold 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WOMEN AND EQUALITY 
Celeste Wesson Interviews historian Wil- 
liam Chafe, about his new book, "Women 
and Equality", a social historian's view of 
the feminist movement. 

1:00 ERASER COLLECTION 
A tanned couple walk through creation, on 
loan from the Museum of Modern Morons. 
Beneath their throbbing temples, toothless 
gaps of knowledge. WBAI's new comedy 
series. Coordinated by Mike Sappol. 

1:30 PUNK ROCK 

music with Tom Sztabnick 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
The Politics of Madness. An hlstoric&i look 
at "madness"; a documentary produced 
by Paul Mclsaac and Dave Metzger In No- 
vember, 1975. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Robert Knight 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 
ABOUT AUDIO 

What you can do at home when difficulties 
occur, and when you need service, what to 
do. Qualified service people will be on 
hand to answer listener questions. Rodger 
Parsons, host. 

8:00 SURVIVORS I 

A rebroadcast of Barbara Londin's Inter- 
view with John Ranz, survivor of the Nazi 
holocaust. 

9:00 A WREATH OF PALE WHITE 
ROSES 

The Necessary Luxury Company celebrates 
the publication of Erika Duncan's first 
novel, "A Wreath of Pale White Roses". 
Included are Interviews with Valerie 
Harms of Magic Circle Press, Gloria Oren- 
stein, critic, and ErIka Duncan. A reading 
from the novel is given by Dolores Bran- 
don. 

10:00 BIX AND BEYOND 
jazz with Dick Sudhalter 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Clayton Riley 



THURSDAY 
4 



5:00 AMERICAN PIE 

free form 'rock', etc. with Ira LlebIn 

7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 



NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jude Quintlere 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

SECOND GENERATION 
Barbara Londin talks with Abraham Krle- 
ger about the situation of the children of 
holocaust survivors and the organization, 
Second Generation. 

1:30 BLUES 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
to be announced 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 THE SOCIETAL IMPLICATIONS OF 
RECENT GENETIC RESEARCH. Dr. Lel- 
be Cavalierl addresses a citizens' group In 
Nutiey, N.J. Nutley Is the world headquar- 
ters of the Hoffman La Roche pharmaceuti- 
cal firm where genetic experiments have 
been going on. The talk Is followed by a 
lively question and answer period. Pro- 
duced by Jerry Hatch. 

8:30 RADIO ACTIVITY 
Bl-weekiy coverage of the struggles 
against nuclear power. This week, Jon Ka- 
llsh Interviews Anna Mayo, who has writ- 
ten frequently for the Village Voice on nu- 
clear power. 

9:00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 
Interviews, readings, music, theater, live 
consciousness raising, discussions and a 
lot of phone calls from listeners make this 
program a place for all women to be toge- 
ther. Produced by Irene Yarrow. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 
jazz with Jamie Katz 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Frank Heller 



FRIDAY 

5 

5:00 HOUROFTHEWOLF 
The Friday morning science fiction extrava- 
ganza. LIveradiowlthJimFreund. 



7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Bill Hellerman 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

IMAMU AMIRI BARAKA: Interview and 
Readings. Amirl Baraka (formerly LeRoi 
Jones), author of "Blues People", "Dutch- 
man", "The Dead Lecturer", and most re- 
cently "The Motion of History", Is inter- 
viewed by Joe Cuomo, editor of "A Shout 
in the Street". Baraka discusses the 
change in his writing concerns, from black 
nationalism to Marxlst-Lenlnist-Mao Tse 
tung-Thought; reforms in capitalist soci- 
ety; and individual liberty In communist 
society. He also reads from his most recent 
book of poetry, "Hard Facts". Produced 
by Joe Cuomo. 

1:30 COME FOR TO SING 
country music with Don Wade 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

community action with Luana Robinson 

4:00 EL BARRIO NUEVO 

live radio with Pablo "Yoruba" Guzman 



6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 JOSEPH STALIN'S ARTWORLD 
"Hello, my name Is Joseph Stalin and I am 
a musicologist. It could not be otherwise. 
Music exists. Music has been created pre- 
cisely to serve society as a whole, as a 
means of Intercourse between people, and 
constitute the tingle music of society". 
Composed and performed by Warren Burt. 
Recorded on location In Sydney, Australia. 
Prepared and edited for broadcast by Mike 
Sappol. 

8:00 GAYRAP 

10:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 
with Mickey Bass 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Malachy McCourl 



SATURDAY 



6 



5:00 SOUNDTRACK 

live radio with Paul Wunder 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

8:30 THE KID'S SHOW 
live radio with Pepsi Charles 

11:00 GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 
"Dark Victory", with Bette Davis and 
Spencer Tracy; originally broadcast In 1940 
by the Lux Radio Theater. Produced by 
Paul Wunder. 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LUNCHPAIL 
Jive radio with Paul Gorman 

2:00 PIPER IN THE MEADOW STRAYING 
Folk and folk-based music from the British 
Isles and North America, presented by Ed- 
ward Haber. 



3:30 EL RINCON CALIENTE 
latin music with Carlos DeLeon 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Diane 

Behar 

7:30 WHAT'S UP? 

WBAI's own series on astronomy and the 
known universe with Dr. Mark Chartrand, 
chairman of the American Museum Hay- 
den Planetarium. With Jim Freund. 

8:30 HIROSHIMA. DAY 
A report of Hiroshima Day activities In the 
New York area and from around the 
country. Produced by Jon Kalish and the 
Public Affairs Department. 

9:30 BETWEEN THE TRACKS 
tape magic with Peter Bochan 

11:00 IT'S NATION TIME 

imamu Amirl Baraka's performance taken 

from his recording first released In 1968. 

Prepared and edited for broadcast by Mike 

Sappol. 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Malachy McCourt 



SUNDAY 



5:00 THE MORNING AFTER THE NIGHT 
BEFORE live radio with Jan Albert 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

8:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING 
Words and music to wake up to on Sunday 
morning. J.S. Bach: Cantata #105 "Herr, 
Gehe Nicht Ins Gerecht"; J.S. Bach: The 
Well Tempered Clavier. 

11:00 IN THE SPIRIT 

spiritual discussion with Lex Hlxon 

1:00 THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 
A Women's Department magazine 



Folio notes 

Welcome to the August issue. I hope you find It to your liking. In keeping 
with our efforts to make the Folio something more than just a program list- 
ing, we have included a few words from our women's department and an 
article on gaining control over your local electric company. We have begun 
receiving letters-to-the-editor and again invite you to express yourself in 
print if you've got a question, a beef or suggestion. We can't guarantee to 
print every letter, but will print those that best exemplify the mail as a 
whole. We are in need of any line graphics of black ink drawings you may 
wish to submit, as well. We've received some good photos so it's "thank 
you" to all the camera people. Again, we invite your glossies of activities, 
events, etc. and ask that you send a stamped, self-addressed envelope if 
you want them back. 

Our station manager, Anna Kosof, is presently attending the Pacifica Na- 
tional Board meeting in California and will return with a "Report to the 
Listener" in September. In its place, we provide you with a brief explana- 
tion of the structure and history of the Pacifica Foundation, the parent 
group that owns WBAI. Hopefully it will help to separate the economic 
realities from the occasional conspiratorial fantasies. 

We have had extremely varied responses to the few programming changes 
that have occurred since our return to the air and so we once again invite 
your written commentary on our programming. A phone call is always ap- 
preciated, but putting it down on paper will guarantee that your opinion 
gets to the right person. With a little luck, we may have a questionnaire on 
programming in the early Fall, but your views carry weight throughout the 
year. What do you want on WBAI? Our last survey (in late 1976) netted only 
about 500 responses so it's rather difficult to honestly plan responsive pro- 
gramming without more real input from more listeners. As may be obvious 
from our "Highlights" page, we are trying very hard to offer you a varied 
and unique radio station, but it's your responses (via comments and dona- 
tions) that make all our work worthwhile. After all-it's your subscription, 
so why not get your money's worth? See you in September! 



© 



2:30 THE GOSPEL SHOW 
A general survey of the music— gospel and 
quartet— from the 30s to the present. Pro- 
duced by Leonard Lopate. 

4;00 LIVE RADIO 
with Ellis Halzlip 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Diane 

Behar 

7:00 THROUGH THE OPERA GLASS 
A month of Manons; tonight's feature: 
Massenet's Manon with Victoria de los 
Angeles conducted by Pierre Monteux 

9:30 DIABLO CANYON 
Anti-nuclear power activists in California 
have planned an occupation of the Diablo 
Canyon nuclear power plant in San Luis 
Obispo for this weekend. We'll have a 
report from the Paciflca stations on the 
West Coast, plus reports from around the 
country on other anti-nul<e actions. Pro- 
duced by Jon Kallsh and the Public Affairs 
Department. 

10:30 WBAI PERFORMANCE 
The Kalevala, a performance by the Tally- 
ing Band. Tiie Kalevala is a theatrical ver- 
sion of the Finnish national epic telling of 
the origins of the universe and the birth of 
song. This production of Alternative Thea- 
ter Radio is partially funded, for engineer- 
ing and artist expenses, by the New Yorlt 
State Council on the Arts. Produced by 
Rick Harris. 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with David Levine 



MONDAY 



8 



5:00 LIVE RADIO 
witti Joe Frank 



7:00 MONDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Charles Mitchell 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WHAT'S UP? 

WBAI's own series on astronomy and the 
known universe, hosted by Dr. Mark Char- 
trand, chairman of the American Museum 
Hayden Planetarium. With Jim Freund. 

1 :00 ANDREW YOUNG AND PRES. CAR- 
TER'S AFRICAN POLICY Celeste Wesson 
interviews Steve Talbot, who covers Africa 
for Internews, about Pres. Carter's Africa 
policy. The program Includes excerpts 
from UN representative Andrew Young's 
testimony before the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee earlier this summer. 

1:30 LATIN MUSIC 
with Max Salazar 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
to be announced 

4:00 NUANCES 

live radio with Pepsi Charles 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Aig 

7:30 THE MERMAID AND THE 
MINOTAUR 

Jane Lazarre, who wrote "The Mother- 
knot", Interviews Dorothy Dinnerstein, 
author of "The Mermaid and the Mino- 
taur", a book about the Inexorably 



ambivalent consequences of female-domi- 
nated child care, and the essential need for 
alternative methods of child rearing. Pro- 
duced by Susan Sheftel. 

8:30 OUR CITY, OUR LIVES 
with Elaine Baly 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
with Bill Farrar 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT SWAN SONG 

live radio with Mickey Waldman 

TUESDAY 



9 



5:00 SKYLIGHT 

Live radio with Barbara Bernstein 

7:00 MONDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Gregory Reeve 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BLACK IMAGE 

with L. James Wilson and Sandra Martinez 

1:00 FAR AFIELD 

see August 2 for details 

1:30 REGGAE 

music with Roger Trilling 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
The Gray Panthers with LIdia Bragger. A 
bi-weekly program looking at the Issues 
concerning senior citizens. Today: The 
Print Media and the Elderly. 

4:00 MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 

live radio with Judle Pasternak 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

HOT FLASHES 

news from Majority Report 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Aig 

7:30 THE LAST NIXON SHOW 
On the anniversary of our former Presi- 
dent's resignation, we rebroadcast our 
award winning documentary on those final 
days. Produced by Richard Barr and Steve 
Post. 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Mike Sappol 



WEDNESDAY 



10 



5:00 MISCELLANEOUS 
live radio with Ondlna Flore 

7:00 RADIO CITY 

live radio with Sara Fishko 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jim Theobold 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FRESH AIR 

1:00 ERASER COLLECTION 
Paps was hearing things, the footsteps of a 
giant Moorish inhabitant very near to him. 
He was a writer nowadays and the blue 
absent light of God shown down upon him, 
but he was perturbed, the debate club 



types made it hard for him to concentrate 
on his eraser collection now laid out before 
him. WBAI's new comedy series. Coordi- 
nated by Mike Sappol. 

1:30 MUSIC SPECIAL 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
The Madness Network with Project Re- 
lease. Members of Project Release, a self 
help ex-patient organization, speak with a 
representative of the Mental Health Law 
Project on the legal rights of psychiatric In- 
mates. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Robert Knight 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 News 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Aig 

7:30 BLACK IMAGE 

with L. James Wilson and Sandra Martinez 

9:00 WOMEN'S STUDIES 
Women's work, politics, heritage, music, 
economics, culture, psychology. . .with in- 
terviews, readings and commentary by, for 
and about women. Produced by Viv Suther- 
land. 

10:00 LIVE FROM THE VILLAGE GATE 
Tonight: Memphis Slim 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Clayton iRIley 

THURSDAY 



11 



5:00 AMERICAN PIE 
live radio with Ira Liebin 

7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jude Qulntlere 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LAMPREYS 

prehistoric hangovers older than plants, 
lampreys are discussed by naturalist and 
author John Miller In an interview with 
Barbara Londin which attempts to clean up 
this parasitic eel's much maligned repu- 
tation. 

1:30 BLUES 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
to be announced 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Aig 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 

ABOUT AUDIO 

Professional standards and their relevance 

to the home audlophlle. Rodger Parsons, 

host. 

8:00 SALUD 

Inside you: a program on health for 
children part one covers the heart and 
lungs. Produced by Martha Katz. 

8:30 SWEATING FOR EQUITY IN NEW 
YORK CITY 

The practical and political aspects of urban 
homesteading, told by people Involved in 
sweat equity projects In the South Bronx 
and the Lower East Side. Produced by 
Peggy Farber. 



9:00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 
Interviews, readings, music, theater, live 
consciousness raising, discussion and a lot 
of phone calls from listeners make this 
program (or all women to be together. Pro- 
duced by Irene Yarrow. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 
jazz with Jamie Katz 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Frank Heller 

FRIDAY 

12 

5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 
The Friday Morning Science Fiction Extra- 
vaganza. This program Is being simulcast 
on Trantor. Live radio with Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9.00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Bill Howie 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

URBAN AFFAIRS SPECIAL 
with Elaine Baly 

1:30 COME FOR TO SING 
with Don Wade 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
People and Power. A space for organiza- 
tions and people working on energy related 
matters, Including Municipalizing of Ener- 
gy (Con Ed), sweat equity programs and 
the use of alternate systems. 

4:00 EL BARRIO NUEVO 

live radio with Pablo "Yoruba " Guzman 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Aig 

7:30 AVAILABLE TO YOU AND ME- 
Part 3 an exploration of public access 
media In New York City. This month, Nina 
Mende looks at citizens' band radio, video 
and cable TV. 

8:00 GAYRAP 

10:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Malachy McCourt 

SATURDAY 

13 

5:00 LONG TIME COMING AND GOING 
live radio with Stacyann Pober 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:00 WOMEN'S WORK WEEKEND 

BEGINS 

For the next 34 hours, the WBAI Women's 

Department will delve into the many 

worlds of the working woman. See article 

on page 3 for more details. 



SUNDAY 
14 



WOMEN'S 
CONTINUES 



WORK 



WEEKEND 



® 



6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna' 



Ihe UJomen's Dept 



After several false starts during the last two years, a 
number of women programmers organized the WBAI 
Women's Department this past spring. Eight women are 
currently working as a collective to coordinate IVz hours of 
woman-identified programming a week, plus special events 
like this month's Women and Work Weekend and Women's 
Consciousness Day in June of this year. The department is 
also developing an internship program that will bring in 
women of different class and ethnic backgrounds to the 
station. 

The members of the department at present are Carmen 
Garcia (The Real Live Lesbian Show, Tuesdays at 9 PM); 
Gerry Hatch (Our Cities, Our Lives, Mondays at 9PM); Judie 
Pasternak (More Than Half the World, Tuesdays at 4 PM: 
"An aging lesbian dropout; used to be a housewife. Was 
mike-shy, then."); Stacyann Pober (announcer, engineer, 
live-radio programmer); Viv Sutherland (Women's Studies, 
Wed. at 9pm); "I have a really complex political philosophy 
— I believe that every woman (or man) has the right to her 
own politics, and the concurrent right to conduct her life 
according to the way she sees fit . . . regardlessof what I, or 
anyone else, thinks about the "Tightness" of her choice. I 



think that this is the only way we're going to take the second 
wave of the women's movement to its logical and inevitable 
conclusion . . . because this is the only way to ensure that 
women are able to take actual control over their own lives. 
Once that happens, the rest of the struggle is much easier to 
deal with. That's what Women's Studies has been about for 
the past three years. That's what my life has been about for 
the past six." Rebecca Tron (The Real Live Lesbian 
Show: "As a Jewish LesbianfromTexas,! have felt like a kid 
in a candy store for eVa eventful (both personally and 
politically) years in NYC. I hope to bring to programs about 
even the most serious issues a sense of humor, in the firm 
belief that our ability to laugh is our greatest sword and 
shield as we fight for our rightful place in this often 
humorless world."); Irene Yarrow (Everywomanspace, 
Thursdays at 9 PM: (36, radical feminist activist, has been 
producing Everywomanspace for over one year. A writer, 
she published many poems and short stories during the late 
sixties and early seventies, and a novel. Ashes, Ashes, We 
All Fall Down, before turning her energies to radio. 
Committed to change, her program exists as an open space 
for exploration, consciousness raising, growth and definition 
for all women, including herself.) 




Members of the WBAI Women's Department: right to left, Viv Sutherland, Rebecca Tron, Irene Yarrow 



6;30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Diane 

Behar 

7:00 THROUGH THE OPERA GLASS 
Puccini's Manon Lesaut with Placldo Or- 
mlngo and Monserrat Caballe. Produced 
by Martin Sokol. 

9:30 LNS BENEFIT 

The Liberation News Service Tenth An- 
niversary Benefit Concert, featuring Bill 
Horwltz, Bernardo Palombo, Bev Grant 
and the Human Condition, The Fiction 
Brothers and Hazel Dickens. Recorded live 
at Washington Irving High School on tv^ay 
20, 1977 by Edward Haber. Sound pro- 
vided by Don Wade. 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with David Levlne 



MONDAY 
IS 

5:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Joe Frank 



7:00 MONDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
With Triston Trombly 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BLACK IMAGE 

WITH L. James Wilson and Sandra 

Martinez 

1:30 LATIN MUSIC 

with Max Salazar 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Addiction Services with Lincoln Detox 

4:00 NUANCES 

live radio with Pepsi Charles 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 



a report of the day's events with Abraham 
Aig 

7:30 WHAT HAPPENED IN INDIA: THE 
1977 ELECTIONS IN PERSPECTIVE 
This two part documentary marks the 30th 
anniversary of India's independence from 
colonial rule. The Indian Parliamentary 
elections this past March made headlines 
around the world and Inspired numerous 
editorial comments about Ihe vindication of 
democracy that Prime Minister Indira Gan- 
dhi's defeat represented. But why did the 
Indian people vote the way they did? Why 
did Mrs. Gandhi lose? Who won? Are 
democracy and human rights Indeed rele- 
vant to the Third World? 

Part 1 of the documentary, "To the Emer- 
gency' ' , outlines the economic and political 
developments that brought Mrs. Gandhi to 
declare an Emergency In 1975 and begin 
almost two years of authoritarian rule. 

Part 2, "The Janata Flood ", documents 
the Emergency: its development toward 
increasing arbitrary rule In a Constitutional 
dictatorship, and analyses why Mrs. 
Gandhi lost the March elections. In conclu- 
sion are discussed those political and eco- 
nomic problems that led to the Emergency 
(and which remain unresolved) as well as 
their significance to India and to us. 



9:00 OUR CITY, OUR LIVES 

a women's program produced by Jerry 

Hatch. 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
with Bill Farrar 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT SWAN SONG 

live radio with Mickey Waldman 

TUESDAY 



16 



5:00 SKYLIGHT 

live radio with Barbara Bernstein and 

Linda Perry. 

7:00 TUESDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 



9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Joe Frank 



© 



NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

JOSEPH CHAIKIN 

The distinguished actor and director reads 
works by Kierkegaard, Beckett, Wallace 
Stevens and American Indians. Produced 
by Rick Harris. 

1:00 FAR AFIELD 
WBAIs spons show. 

1:30 REGGAE 

music with Roger Trilling 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
The Day Care Action Coalition 

4:00 MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 
live radio with Judle Pasternak 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 BLACK IMAGE 

with L. James Wilson and Sandra Martinez 

9:00 THE REAL LIVE LESBIAN SHOW 
see August 2 for details 

10:00 WEATHERBIRD 
jazz with Gary GIddens 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 



MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Mike Sappol 

WEDNESDAY 



17 



5:00 MISCELLANEOUS 
live radio with Ondina Flore 

7:00 RADIO CITY 

live radio with Sara FIshko 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jim Theobold 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE SHAH AND WE 
a report on some of the connections be- 
tween the United States and Iran, pro- 
duced by Erica Schwartz 

1:00 ERASER COLLECTION 
Today's topics: plural birth, "mercy"lsm, 
how your tax dollars go to fund humor in 
the Soviet Union and the face at birth. 
WBAIs new comedy series. Coordinated 
by Mike Sappol. 

1:30 PUNK ROCK 
music with Tom Sztabnick 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Robert Knight 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 SURVIVORS II 

Barbara LondIn Interviews survivors of the 
Warsaw Ghetto, one of whom also saw 
time In 3 concentration camps. 

9:00 WOMEN'S STUDIES 
Women's work, politics, heritage, music, 
economics, culture, psychology. . with In- 
terviews, readings and commentary by, for 
and about women. Produced by VIv Suther- 
land. 

10:00 BIX AND BEYOND 
jazz with Dick Sudhalter 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Clayton Riley 



THURSDAY 
18 

5:00 AtVlERICAN PIE 
live radio with Ira Liebin 

7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jude Quintiere 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CURRENTS IN OUR GLOBAL EXPERI 
ENCE 

programs centered around belief systems 
affecting life on planet earth. Today: 
"Communications with other than Man", 
scientist John Lilly with his wife Tony, co- 
authors of "The Dyadic Cyclone", discuss 
oceanic Intelligence and communication 
with Cetacea. Produced by Linda Perry. 

1:30 BLUES 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Science and Health Issues with Eileen 

Zailsk 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 ABORTION: A WOMAN'S RIGHT TO 
CHOOSE (IF SHE HAS THE MONEY) 
Eileen Zailsk talks with Rhonda Copelan 
and Nancy Stearns, of the Center for Con- 
stitutional Rights, about recent Supreme 
Court decisions and legislation that cuts 
back on public funding for abortions. 

8:30 RADIO ACTIVITY 

Bi-weekly coverage of the struggles 

against nuclear power, produced by John 

Kalish 



9:00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 
Interviews, readings, music, theater, live 
consciousness raising, discussion and a lot 
of phone calls from listeners make this pro- 
gram a place for all women to be together. 
Produced by Irene Yarrow. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 
jazz with Jamie Katz 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Frank Heller 



FRIDAY 



19 



5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 
The Friday Morning Science Fiction Extra- 
vaganza. Guests, readings, dramas and 
discussion from and revolving about the SF 
community. With Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
to be announced 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LIFE OF SHAKESPEARE 

Rick Harris Interviews Samuel Schoen- 
baum, author of "William Shakespeare: A 
Compact Documentary Life" 

1:30 COME FOR TO SING 

folk music with Don Wade 

3.00 BREAD AND ROSES 
with Luana Robinson 

4:00 EL BARRIO NUEVO 
with Pablo Yoruba Guzman 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 




What Happened In India: the 1977 Elections 
In Perspective, twill be heard Monday, August 
15, 7 pm 



7:30 AVAILABLE TO YOU AND ME— 
PART 4 A continuing series on public 
access media in New York City. This 
month, producer Nina Mende investigates 
citizens band radio, video and cable TV. 

8:00 GAYRAP 

10:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 
with Mickey Bass 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Malachy McCourt 

SATURDAY 

20 

5:00 SOUNDTRACK 

live radio with Paul Wunder 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

8:30 THE KID'S SHOW 
live radio with Pepsi Charles 

11:00 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 
presents "The Jolson Story" starring Al 
Jolson. Originally broadcast in 1948 by the 
Lux Radio Theater. Produced by Paul 
Wunder. 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE NEXT SWAN 

Live Radio with Mickey Waldman 

2:00 OUTSIDE IN 

an Interview with British musician John 
Martyn who Incorporates jazz, folk, and 
blues elements Into his music. Produced by 
Edward Haber. 

3:30 EL RINCON CALIENTE 
latin music with Carlos DeLeon 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Diane 

Behar 

7:00 WHAT'S UP? 

WBAI's own series on astronomy and the 
known universe, hosted by Dr. Mark Char- 
frand, chairman of the American Museum 
Hayden Planetarium. Produced by Mark 
Chartrand and Jim Freund. 

8:30 GROW YOUR OWN 
urban ecology with Liz Christy 

9:30 BETWEEN THE TRACKS 
tape magic with Peter Bochan 

11:00 BIRTH OF A VOICE ON BREATH 
(this program contains frank language. If 
you feel you might be offended by such 
language, please tune away and rejoin us 
in one hour.) Voice: sound uttered by living 
beings, esp. by human beings In speech or 
song, crying, shouting, etc. (Webster's). 
Utterances moving from breath to lan- 
guage: Charles Morrow, Steve and Gloria 
Tropp, YukI Hartman and Meredith Monk, 
taped from live performances and WBAI 
studio readings. Produced by Judith 
Ghinger. 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Malachy McCourt 



SUNDAY 
21 



5:00 MORNING AFTER THE NIGHT 

BEFORE 

live radio with Jan Albert 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 



8:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING 
J.S. Bach: Cantata #199: ■'Meln Herze 
schwlrrtmt Im Blut"; J.S. Bach: The Well 
Tempered Clavier 

11:00 IN THE SPIRIT 

spiritual discussion with Lex Hlxon 

1:00 THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 
a women's department magazine 

2:30 THE GOSPEL SHOW 
A general survey of the music— gospel and 
quartet— (rom the 30's to the present. Pro- 
duced by Leonard Lopate. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Ellis Halzllp 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Diane 

Behar 

7:00 THROUGH THE OPERA GLASS 
More Manons: Auber's "Lescaut". Pro- 
duced by Martin Sokol. 

9:30 LIVE FROM THE VILLAGE GATE 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with David Levelne 



MONDAY 
22 

5:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Joe Frank 



7:00 MONDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Charles Mitchell 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BLACK IMAGE 

with L. James Wilson and Sandra Martinez 

1:30 LATIN MUSIC 
with Max Salazar 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Alternate Cancer Therapies with Ruth 

Sackman 

4:00 NUANCES 

live radio with Pepsi Charles 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Operation Luna" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 BEYOND THE BALLOT: THE AU- 
THORITY OF PUBLIC AUTHORITIES 
Part four of an Investigation of political 
power immunized against public control. 
Tonight, Lindsay Audin reveals unpub- 
lished Information about the extent of 
"public benefit corporations" In the Unit- 
ed States and especially New York State. 

9:00 OUR CITY, OUR LIVES 



a program featuring women working for a 
better community. Produced by Jerry 
Hatch. 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
with Bill Farrar 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT SWAN SONG 

live radio with Mickey Waldman 

TUESDAY 



23 



5:00 SKYLIGHT 

live radio with Linda Perry 

7:00 TUESDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Gregory Reeve 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

BRAZILIAN MUSIC 
with Mlldren Norman 

1:00 FAR AFIELD 
WBAI's new sport show 

1:30 REGGAE 

music with Roger Trilling 

3!00 BREAD AND ROSES 

The Gray Panthers with LIdIa Bragger. A 

bi-weekly program looking at the Issues 



concerning senior citizens. Today: Myths 
about Aging. 

4:00 MORE THAN HALF THE WORLD 
live radio with Judie Pasternak 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the final chapter of "Operation Luna" 

HOT FLASHES 

news from Ma)orlty Report 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 BLACK IMAGE 

with L. James Wilson and Sandra Martinez 

9:00 THE REAL LIVE LESBIAN SHOW 
see August 2 for details 

10:00 WEATHERBIRD 
jazz with Gary Giddens 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Mike Sappol 



WEDNESDAY 



24 



5:00 MISCELLANEOUS 
live radio with Ondlna Flore 

7:00 RADIO CITY 

live radio with Sara FIshko 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 







PUBLIC POWER: FIRST STEP TO PEOPLE'S POWER? by Llnduy AudIn 

In the last three years, electricity costs have tripled or quadrupled across the country. Much 
of this Is due to fuel cost Increases, but a significant portion Is the result of splraling capital 
and equipment costs. In either case, electric utilities are no longer symbols of friendly, 
economical service. Instead, they are often criticized as being "legalized" monopolies, 
insensitive to both the people they serve and the environment they degrade. 

As a result of this new stature, utilities are coming under Increasing fire from public service 
commissions, consumer groups and environmental coalitions. Unfortunately, the lack of an 
alternative to them has placed such struggles In an odd position: sure, the power company Is 
ripping us off, but there's no place else to go for juice. Even the state regulatory agencies 
can't seem to get control over the economic maze of rate-setting., 

in the last two years, though, some rate payers have "re-discovered" an old option: taking 
over the utility and controlling it themselves. As a matter of fact, the consumers of New York 
State have formed a People's Power Coalition to push for public ownership of all electric 
companies, is this just another group of a "radical" tinge? Hardly. Most are from upstate, 
where left-wing politics is viewed with more than small suspicion. For the most part, they are 
simply citizens fed up with the high cost of power and who have heard that public ownership 
would cut their bills 30% —or more. 

Since electric utilities have a long history of public ownership, there Is nothing new about 
owning them through a municipality. As a matter of fact, 2000 publicly owned power 
companies are operating in this country today. They generate 23% of the power and do It 
cheaper and more reliably than their Investor-owned counterparts. The basic economy comes 
from the fact that they are not-profit entitles; thus, they don't pay out dividends and have no 
income taxes. They can also borrow capital at lower Interest rates because their bonds are 
tax-exempt. Combine that with an Incentive to be economical (instead of the reverse 
inclination heir to other utilities) and It's obvious that even the most capitalistic rate payer 
would gladly "go public"— and save on his/ her electric bills. 

The Important difference of non-profltablllty shows up due to the particular rate setting 
mechanism that grew up over the years of utility expansion. Electric rates are regulated for 
Investor owned utilities to guarantee a specific rate of return on Invested capital. In other 
words, a set percentage (usually between 9 and 13%) of the value of the plant Is guaranteed 
as annual dividends to keep the market rating of utility stocks high enough so the utility can 
continue expanding through easy access to capital. Electric power demand has been 
doubling every ten years, and to keep up, the power companies needed to expand as rapidly 
as that demand (much of which they helped to create through advertising)- and that meant 
borrowing ever more money through Wall Street. Investors usually seek high-return, 
low-risk ventures and electric companies seemed perfect. After all, where else was there a 
state guaranteed profit, no competition and an ever Increasing need for an irreplaceable 
product? Eventually, though, this growth-oriented mechanism went awry. Since the total 
profit was always a constant percent of plant value, the only way to Increase profits was to 
Increase plant value. Thus, If it came to a choice between an expensive desk and a cheap one, 
the Incentive would be to spend the most. All capital costs and material costs are passed on 
to the consumer anyway (in the form of higher rates) and a percent of the desk's value always 
recouped In that (typically) 12% profit margin. When the system Is extended to generating 
capacity, the Incentive Is to buy the biggest, most expensive generators— like nuclear plants. 

Publicly owned. systems, though, have their rates set by the local controlling board, be It a 
city council, a county legislature or an appointed board of governors— and the watchword Is 
"economy In all things". All benefits are experienced by the entire community, not just a 
minority of stockholders. Some critics of public power (like Con Ed) have said that, since 
public power systems pay no taxes, they merely leave money uncollected In the pockets of 



the citizen instead of collecting It for beneficial public projects, like schools or sewers. The 
fact Is, though, that almost all public systems give annual payments (in lieu of taxes) to the 
municipalities that surround them. Historically, those payments have matched the tax 
payments of Investor owned utilities. In some communities, the benefit is experienced as 
free power and light to the city— energy which would normally be bought with taxes collected 
from a private power company. In the end, public systems are still cheaper and better for the 
community because the municipality's capital (the llfeblood of a healthy city) remains where 
It will do the most good: In the community. Many private utilities are net exporters of capital 
since their major stockholders are banks and Investment firms that use those dividends 
where they can get higher profits (but usually with higher risks)— such as in ioverseas 
financial adventures. 

Because a public power system Is run by e[ected or appointed people, they must be more 
responsive to the demands of citizens, lest they lose their jobs. Similarly, if a community 
wanted to Institute a policy like "life-line rates" (which give a specified amount of power at a 
lower rate to the poor or those on fixed Incomes), it need only mandate It through their local 
political body (e.g., city council) instead of fighting It out In the state legislature whee private 
utilities control powerful lobbies. 

Finally, public power has another advantage: the built in capacity to begin nationalization of 
the energy monopolies. If enough communities went public, they would control a significant 
portion of the total demand for energy. At present, electricity gobbles up over 20% of all 
primary fuels (gas, oil and coal) and, with environmental constraints, will probably control 30 
or 40% of them by the end of this century. Just as the power of "eminent domain" can be 
applied to expropriate a power company, so can it be used to enforce purchase of part or all of 
a primary fuel supplier— like Exxon. With the combined clout as consumer, political entity 
and definer of community needs, there might just be enough power to challenge the biggest 
corporations. As a matter of fact, some public power companies have already leased coal 
fields in anticipation of becoming Independent of the energy companies. Many others are 
moving Into solar, geothermal and conservation technologies to further reduce their 
dependence on the fuel barons. 

The movement toward public power, then, contains a number of significant possibilities for 
social and political change. Groups are forming in several parts of the country and interest Is 
rising even faster than electric rates. To get in touch with the People's Power Coalition main 
headquarters, write to them at P.O. Box 147, Kerhonksen, N.Y. 12446. They can provide 
guidance and hard data on the values of public power. An excellent comprehensive booklet 
just published on this topic Is also available from the Environmental Action Foundation, 724 
Dupont Circle Building, Washington, D.C. 20036. The booklet, entitled "Taking Charge", 
costs $2.00 and is easily worth it. 

There are two other groups operating In the New York City area specifically to 
"municipalize" Con Ed. They are: 

The Coalition for a Publicly Owned and Democratically Controlled Public Utility, 1 E. 125 St., 
New York City (831-6561) or 535 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn (783-2408). 

People's Power Coalition, 134 E. Mosholu Pkwy. S., Bronx, N.Y. 10458 (298-7622). 

Residents of Westchester County are fortunate In that their county executive, and several 
legislators, are backing a partial takeover of the Con Ed system. Preliminary studies are 
underway and supporters can work through the office of the County Executive, Al Del Bello 

In White Plains. 

Convincing such local governments of the viability of public power Is the first step to making 
electricity a new source of "people's power". 



© 



9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jim Theobold 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

THE FEMALE ANGST 
Anals Nin. Joan DIdlon and Dory Previn 
discuss the private pain of being a woman, 
Freud, death, depression and what has In- 
fluenced their writmg Produced at KPFK. 

2:00 MUSIC SPECIAL 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
The Madness Network with Project Re- 
lease Psychiatric Drugs, Health or Ha- 
zard? With David Briggs of the Project Re- 
lease, the author of a consumer's guide to 
psychiatric drugs. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Robert Knight 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the first chapter of "Journey to the 
Center of the Earth" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 
ABOUT AUDIO 

AM stereo. 4 channel FM, and FM recep- 
tion problems are discussed by Len Feid- 
man and host Rodger Parsons. 

8:00 URBAN AFFAIRS SPECIAL 
with Elaine Baly 

9:00 WOMEN'S STUDIES 
Women's work, politics, heritage, music, 
economics, culture, psychology. . .with in- 
tervluws, readings and commentary by, for 
and about women. Produced by Vlv Suther- 
land. 

10:00 BIX AND BEYOND 
iazz with Dick Sudhaiter 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Clayton Riley 

THURSDAY 



25 



5:00 AMERICAN PIE 
live radio with Ira LlebIn 

7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jude Ouintlere 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

YLEM 

If you'd like to find out what this means, 
one of the best ways would be by tu iing In. 
Talla Morris (with help from Jim i-reund) 
will examine (and maybe juggln) such 
things as space, time and black holes. 

1:00 ERASER COLLECTION 
"Do you love me?" Jane signed, her eyes 
finally opening again into the glaze of day- 
light In Brooklyn ... but It wasn't Klaus her 
eyes opened up onto. It was Paps, her wi- 
thered lover, chewing on his collection of 
erasersi WBAI's new comedy series, 
blamed on Mike Sappol. 

1:30 BCUES 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

a program looking at issues concerning the 

disabled; produced by the Disabled In 

Action 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
to be announced 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Journey to the 
Center of the Earth" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 



6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 SALUD 

Inside you: a program on health for chil- 
dren tonight— digestion and nutrition. 
Produced by Martha Katz. 

8:00 HAZEL DICKENS 
A portrait in words and music of songwriter 
and singer Hazel Dickens; growing up in a 
West Virginia mining town, writing politi- 
cal songs, preserving her Identity In a 
world different from her own. Produced by 
Peggy Farber. 

9:00 EVERYWOMANSPACE 
Interviews, readings, music, theater, live 
consciousness raising, discussion and a lot 
of phone calls from listeners make this a 
program for all women. Produced by Irene 
Yarrow. 

10:00 SCRAPPLE FROM THE APPLE 
jazz with Jamie Katz 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Frank Heller 



FRIDAY 



26 



® 



5:00 HOUR OF THE WOLF 
The Friday Morning Science Fiction Extra- 
vaganza. "Hey man, that's metaphysically 
absurd; How do I know what you hear?" 
Live radio with Jim Freund. 

7:00 ROOM 101 

live radio with Steve Post 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Bill Howie 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

SAM JACKSON 

In this memorial service for Dalton Trumbo 
(Sam Jackson was one of his many pen 
names used to avoid the blacklist), the au- 
thor Is remembered for his clash with the 
H.U.A.C. and for his writings by fellow 
writers Ring Lardner, Ian Hunter, Michael 
Wilson and others and actor-producer Kirk 
Douglas. Produced by Jim Borland, KPFK. 

AN INTERVIEW WITH J. P. DONLEAVY 
One of the world's most private writers 
discusses his most recent book, "The Un- 
expurgated Code", a compilation of the 
rules of social climbing which he has dis- 
covered. Produced by Steve Helmel and 
Marsha Carter, KPFT. 

1:30 COME FOR TO SING 
folk music with Don Wade 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
People and Power; a space for organiza- 
tions and people working on energy related 
matters Including municipalizing of energy 
(Con Ed) sweat equity programs and the 
use of alternate energy systems. 

4:00 EL BARRIO NUEVO 

live radio with Pablo "Yoruba" Guzman 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Journey to the 
Center of the Earth" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:15 AVAILABLE TO YOU AND ME- 
PART 5 An exploration of public access 
media in New York City, produced by Nina 
Mende. 

8:00 GAYRAP 

10:00 ADVENTURES IN JAZZ 
with Mickey Bass 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Malachy McCourt 



SATURDAY 

27 

5:00 LONG TIME COMING AND GOING 
live radio with Stacyann Pober 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

8:30 THE KID'S SHOW 
live radio with Pepsi Charles 

11:00 THE GOLDEN AGE OF RADIO 
presents the Lux Radio Theater version of 
"Key Largo " with Edward G. Robinson 
and Claire Trevor. Produced by Paul 
Wunder. 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

LUNCHPAIL 

live radio with Paul Gorman 

2:00 PIPER IN THE MEADOW STRAYING 
folk and folk-based music from the British 
Isles and North America, presented by Ed- 
ward Haber. 

3:30 EL RIn6oN CALIENTE 
latin music with Carlos OeLeon 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter In "Journey to the 
Center of the Earth" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events by Abraham 

Aig 

7:00 WHAT'S UP? 

WBAI's own series on astronomy and the 
known universe with Dr. Mark Chartrand, 
chairman of the American Museum Hay- 
den Planetarium. Produced by Mark Char- 
trand and Jim Freund. 

8:30 WOMEN'S EQUALITY DAY 

a report of today's events from the WBAI 

Women's Department 

9:30 BETWEEN THE TRACKS 
tape magic with Peter Bochan 

11:00 ONUS CUBES 

(This program contains frank language. If 
you feel that you may be offended by such 
language, please tune away and rejoin us 
in one hour.) You're in a garden, each leg 
stretched forth Into flnltude, a torse sways 
on that behind. A few weeds clod together 
grouped randomly by rake and hoe, all hist 
within notice of a zero. Performances by 
Clark Coolldge, Steve and Gloria Tropp, 
Tom Clark, Ron Padgett, Bernard Whlte- 
law-Alphabet and many others. Recorded 
on location at The Body Politic In Chicago 
and at the St. Mark's Poetry Project In New 
York City. Produced by Mike Sappol. 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Malachy McCourt 

SUNDAY 

28 

5:00 MORNING AFTER THE NIGHT 




ABORTION: A WOMAN'S RIGHT TO 
CHOOSE (IF SHE HAS THE MONEY) 
will be heard THURSDAY, 7:30 p.m., 
AUGUST 18 



BEFORE 

live radio with Jan Albert 

8:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

8:30 HERE OF A SUNDAY MORNING 
J.S. Bach: Cantata #35: "Gelst und Seele 
wird verwirret"; J.S. Bach: The Well Tem- 
pered Clavier. 

11:00 IN THE SPIRIT 

spiritual discussion with Lex Hixon 

1:00 THE VELVET SLEDGEHAMMER 
a Women's Department magazine 

2:30 THE GOSPEL SHOW 
A general survey of the music— gospel and 
quartet— from the 30'3 to the present. Pro- 
duced by Leonard Lopate. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Ellis Halzllp 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Journey to the 
Center of the Earth" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events with Diane 

Behar 

7:00 THROUGH THE OPERA GLASS 
Enrico Caruso, part 4. Our journey through 
Caruso's complete recordings has taken us 
to approximately 1912 and the middle of 
his recording career for RCA Victor. Pro- 
duced by Martin Sokol. 

9:30 AUDIO EXPERIMENTAL THEATER 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with David Levinn 



The Friends of WBAI 



ACTION NUMBER 675-3045 
Regional contacts 

Lower Manhattan 

Upper Manhattan 

Brooklyn 

Bronx 

Queens 

Nassau-Suffolk 

Westchester 

New Jersey 

Mailing address: c/0 Box 271, New Vernon 

PIaaaa inin iir — AH llfttAriArs ArA wAlcnma 



/ / 



/ 



929-5506 or 924-8582 

535-0239 or 628-4005 

743-7193 or 645-1811 

655-9113 

359-2921 or 939-4534 

(516) 735-7158 or (516) 785-8836 

(914)693-5953 

(201 ) 568-6234 or (201 ) 538-6676 

N.J. 07976 



-^// 



MONDAY 

29 

5:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Joe Frank 



7:00 MONDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last nlght'3 news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with the Laughing Cavalier 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

WHAT'S HAPPENING IN SPAIN? 
A discussion of recent developments In 
Spain, focusing on the Anarchist Labor 
movement and Euro-communism. Pro- 
duced by Dave Metzger. 

1:30 LATIN Music 
with Max Salazar 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 

Addiction Services with Lincoln Detox 

4:00 NUANCES 

live radio with Pepsi Charles 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Journey to the 
Center of the Earth" 

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
with Larry Chan 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the day's events by Abraham 

Alg 

7:30 BEYOND THE BALLOT: ON FOUN- 
DATIONS 

Part 5 Is an investigation of political power 
immunized from public control. Tonight, 
Lindsay Audin analyzes the growth 
status of foundations In the United States. 

8:30 FADE-IN 

Judith Kass Interviews Leonard Maltin, 
author of a new traok on the "Our Gang" 
comedy series. 



9:00 OUR CITY, OUR LIVES 
Whatever happened to Community Con- 
trol? The Idea of decentralization and com- 
munity control of schools is an Idea whose 
times has come but It seems as though its 
days are numbered. Sally Marllno Fisher, 
a local school board member and Christine 
Noschese of the National Congress of 
Neighborhood Women are heard. 

10:00 JAZZ SAMPLER 
with Bill Farrar 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT SWAN SONG 

live radio with Mickey Waldman 



TUESDAY 



30 



5:00 SKYLIGHT 

live radio with Barbara Bernstein 

7:00 TUESDAY MORNING SHOW 
live radio with Paul Gorman 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 DIIZY GILLESPIE DAY 
Today, until midnight, we feature the 
music of Dizzy Gillespie, culminating in a 
live concert starring the jazz musician at 
the Village Gate at 10 pm. 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Mike Sappol 



WEDNESDAY 



31 



5:00 MISCELLANEOUS 
live radio with Ondlna Flore 

7:00 RADIO CITY 

live radio with Sara FIshko 

9:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 



NEWS 

a rebroadcast of last night's news 

9:30 MORNING MUSIC 
with Jim Theobold 

NOON PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN — 
HYDROPONICALLY! 
A rebroadcast of a program from the "Wel- 
come to the Machine" series. This one 
covers urban rooftop farming by hydro- 
ponics In the Williamsburg section of 
Brooklyn. Produced by Lindsay Audln. 

1:00 PRE-LIBERATION CHINA 
Banning Garrett, reporter for Internews, Is 
heard. 

1:30 PUNK ROCK 

music with Tom Sztabnick 

3:00 BREAD AND ROSES 
Everything you ever wanted to know about 
welfare but didn't know who to ask. First in 
a series of discussions on everyone's most 
unfavored government program. Discus- 
sions will Include: why do we have a wel- 
fare system? who profits from It? what can 
be done to change It? Listener participation 
Is expected. 

4:00 LIVE RADIO 
with Robert Knight 

6:00 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 
plus the next chapter of "Journey to the 
Center of the Earth" 

6:30 NEWS 

a report of the daj^'s events with Abraham 

Alg 

7:15 SPECTRUM: CONVERSATIONS 
ABOUT AUDIO 

Audio standards and their significance (or 
lack of It) are discussed by Larry Kline, 
technical editor of "Stereo Review" and 
authority on audio Julian HIrsch. Host Is 
Rodger Parsons. 

8:00 UNDER SURVEILLANCE 
A documentary detailing a vast network of 
police spying on the anti-war movement In 
Madison, Wisconsin, 1967-1973. The pro- 
gram documents the compilation of intel- 
ligence files by local informants and 



undercover police on hundreds of activists, 
and the eventual Involvement of federal 
agencies In the process. Produced by David 
Levine. 

9:00 WOMEN'S STUDIES 
Women's work, politics, heritage, music, 
economics, culture, psychology. . .with In- 
terviews, readings and commentary by, for 
and about women. Produced by VIv Su- 
therland. 

10:00 BIX AND BEYOND 
iazz with Dick Sudhalter 

11:55 PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS 

MIDNIGHT 

live radio with Clayton Riley 




Tune in Hot Flashes, news from 
Majority Report, Tuesdays, 6:15 pm 



Other 



LETTERS, continued from page ^ 



PHOTO AND GRAPHICS CREDITS: Women's Graphic Collective, 
Smitu Kothari (photo of Indira Gandhi poster), cover photos by Billie 
Firdman under a grant from the Westchester County Executive's Office of 
Employment and Training; to see the entire collection of 35 photos of 
women working, contact Peggy Blum at (914) 683-3048 or 3049 as they are 
on display at various points in Westchester County. Half tones courtesy of 
The Feminist Bulletin, Scarborough, N.Y. 



PROGRAMMING 

If you have an idea for a program, drop a 
note to the head of the appropriate depart- 
ment (e.g., public affairs, drama and lit- 
erature) or to the program coordinator 
(Rick Harris) describing the idea and 
including your name and address and 
phone number, the amount of time you can 
devote to the project and a few words on 
your background. We'll do our best to re- 
spond to all suggestions. 
CLASSIFIED 

Violin lessons; B.M. Mannes College, be- 
ginners-advanced; reasonable rates. 
924-3531 . 

guilty, inadequate? A transactional analy- 
sis ongoing therapy group provides a safe, 
non-threatening environment to learn and 
try out new ways of relating and to change 
your "life script." Evening or daytime 
small groups. Nonsexist professional 
therapist. Affordable fees. Also Individual 
sessions. (212) 595-1022. 



Seminar In Learning Hypnosis and Auto- 
Hypnosis. Learn principles and application 
to cope with smoking, compulsive eating, 
insomnia, anxiety and hypertension. Im- 
prove concentration. Four sessions, $35. 
Dr. Barron, 360-6377, evenings 831-2089. 

we invite your advertising In the Folio at 
the following rates; 

classified ads: 

per line (5 words per line, 4 lines min.) 

$1.00 
displays (camera-ready): 
per column Inch (14 pica column) 7.50 

quarter page 107.25 

half page 202.50 

full page 360.00 

3 or more insertions 5% discount 

full year (12 Insertions) 10% discount 

No sexist or racist advertising, please. 



July 12, 1977 



Dear Mr. Audin: 



We were all astonished when we read the paragraph which appeared on page nine of the 
July Folio under the heading "Friends of WBAI". No one In our group knows of any request, 
made by you or any other staff member, for Information about the Friends' regional co-ordl- 
nators, although such information would have been made readily available to you. Moreover, 
we find your omission of our action number, with which you are familiar, extremely perplex- 
ing, in view of the promise made to your readers In the July Folio, we are at a loss to under- 
stand why you have made no attempt to solicit this information for the August folio. Al- 
though we dislike to question your integrity, such a procedure must cast doubt on your credi- 
bility and that of the station as a whole. 

We are sending you, by registered mail, updated information about regional 
co-ordinators. We will expect It to appear in the August Folio precisely as given below. 
Furthur (sic), asWBAI'sonly listener organization, the Friends of WBAI demand additional 
monthly space In the Folio, starting with the September issue. The space will be used to pre- 
sent information of fundamental concern to listener-subscribers. 

Please replay. We would consider It an iadication of good faith on your part II you would 
print this letter In full. 

Sincerely yours, Kathy Morton, for the Friends of WBAI 

Dear Kathy; 

Thank you for the clarification regarding the Friends. The confusion resulted from state- 
ments given to me by a member of the Steering Committee of the Friends (you have now In- 
formed me It is a lormer steering committee member) and an individual answering a phone 
listed on your action line. Both told me you were going through reorganization so I felt that 
no further verification was needed. In any case, the phone numbers you gave me are listed in 
this Folio. 

I must smile, however, when at the same time you say you have not gone through a reorgani- 
zation, you are still changing the phone numbers you sent me by registered mall over the 
telephonel 

Regarding your requ*est for a regular space for the Friends: as you know, I am not opposed to 
it, but I am Informed by the manager that "no such space will be allocated to any listener 
groups until their positions regarding the station are clarified". If you wish to discuss this 
Idea further, the proper discussion would be with the station manager. 

Yours, Lindsay Audln, editor 



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from the 

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